Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II


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The PR, which had controlled Perak for nearly a year, proactively tried to assist the indigenous people of the state such as the Semai.


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The PR Menteri Besar cancelled logging and plantation activities near the community of Gopeng and returned acres of land to the Orang Asli. The party established an Orang Asli Task Force last October for the purpose of securing land titles for as many indigenous people as possible. Chaired by Datuk Ngeh Koo Ham, a senior executive in the state, the task force assisted in the review of historical and geographical surveys of Orang Asli ancestral lands. Those surveys might assist the land titles review.

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Tijah, the primary indigenous liaison person to the task force, discussed the Semai reactions to the party in power last year. In the 10 months of the Pakatan Rakyat state government, we felt the promise of citizenship begin to be fulfilled. She said that last year was the first time people in her community had been asked to discuss matters, to air their grievances publicly, and to negotiate issues.

Lessons learned from a year at Malaysia’s levers of power

She told the reporter that she hoped the BN, now back in power, would continue the PR policies toward them. But she is not confident that will happen.

In fact, she said she would not be surprised if the BN scraps the enlightened PR policies. After all, they have a 51 year history of discriminating and denying rights to the indigenous communities. The new logging plans—the red paint and helicopter surveys—fit into an old pattern. The basic question, though, is why there is so much discrimination in Malaysia against the Orang Asli societies? Some of the news stories and reviews about the Semai , Batek , and Chewong over the past four years have provided analyses of the discriminatory actions taken by Malaysia and its state governments against these people.

The primary reason for the persecution is that the Malaysian state is founded on the premise that the Malay people, only 51 percent of the population, should have special privileges.

People & Culture

These are guaranteed in their constitution and are reflected in the laws, policies and practices of the Malay-controlled society. The Malays support their claim for their right to special privileges with the assertion that they are the original inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula. Using that claim, and the fact that they barely have a majority of the total population, they can better justify marginalizing the two large minority groups that immigrated into the peninsula, mostly over the past several hundred years.

Those immigrants—Malaysians of Chinese ancestry, 30 percent of the national population, and people of Indian heritage, about 9 percent of the nation—appear, to them, to threaten their hegemony.

The village, situated by the Bidor River hence the name was a local commercial centre trading mainly in goods. Later, the tin mining boom brought in the Hokkien-speaking Hoklo who came from various parts of Perak as a result of triad wars among the Chinese. Today it has about 25, residents. According to several local Malaysian historians, the area used to be part of the Gangga Negara based on the th century bronze Buddhist Avalokitesvara statue found in in Bidor.

The people in this area accepted Hindu-Buddhism around years ago. That makes the area one of the oldest settlements in Malaysia. In , the declaration of Emergency by the then British colonial government set up several New Villages around Bidor, the most famous being the Kampung Baru Bidor Stesyen just across the rail line of Bidor. Its Chinese name is Fire Car Head. It is still strong in fruit growing. Most west Malaysians who love petai, the famous or infamous stinky beans, will stop at Bidor to get the best of the freshly plucked beans, tied together in bundles at RM30 to RM50 each.

Malaysian Politics and the Rights of the Orang Asli | Peaceful Societies

Many Sarawakians who have lived with petai trees grown by their great grandfathers, would know how tall each tree could grow after 15 years! Some can even be feet tall and an male Orang Asli is just the man for the job. A townie might not even scale more than 10 feet before getting dizzy. The beans usually grow at the end of the small branches, so the picker will need to be very lithe and nimble barefoot of course to reach the very end of the small branches, perhaps feet above the ground.

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RM30 is a small price to pay for 20 of these precious bean pods. If one does not want to buy the beans, one can have a taste of them in one of the stalls in Bidor.


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  • Order stir-fried petai with prawns and belacan to go with the famous local noodles and other dishes! An entire road is reserved for the trading of petai, the smelliest and largest of equatorial edible beans in Bidor. Housewives, businessmen and women and tourtists flock to Bidor and petai is the first word they have on their lips.

    The name Senoi Praaq means war people or those who fight in the Semai language. He pressed for the formation of the Senoi Praaq as a deterrent force to stop the communist influence over the remote Orang Asli aboriginal settlements in the deep jungles. Noone thought of the original idea to set up a Senoi Unit, which was established in May , and Noone was made the commanding officer, serving from until The Malayan Emergency was officially declared over in — Wikipedia. Apart from picking up some pointers from various sources, another interesting note is that of wearing of the RED Beret.

    This unit of Orang Asli force was bestowed the Red beret by the British, which is worn with pride by the unit to this day. During the restructuring of the Police Field Force in , the Senoi Praaq was made part of the Police General Operations Forces and to wear the blue beret but this was rescinded and the right to wear the red beret was restored in — Wikipedia.

    References

    Yik Sang Coffee Shop in Bidor is a good pitstop, offering well-cooked food and a long menu. It only shows the dishes are popular and the chefs are not able to meet the demand on busy days. Pun Chun is another restaurant for tourists.

    Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II
    Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II
    Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II
    Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II
    Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II Power and Politics: The Story Of Malaysias Orang Asli II

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